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ending explained

i’m thinking of ending things ^ Ending Explained

Directed by Charlie Kaufman, the mind behind the 2004 hit Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Do you remember that one? Starring Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet?), I’m thinking of ending things is another magnificent puzzle that deserves to be seen on more than one occasion. And maybe then, we can see the big picture.

And yes, I get it, this is a world where the trend in cinema (and almost everything else) is to go easy, the not-so-challenging (look at the numbers on the box office of Fast and Furious , and the Marvel Cinematic Universe ), and a film like this implies a challenge, since it tests the viewer to analyze a myriad of details strategically placed by the director to understand them.

But don’t worry, because if after watching the 134 minutes of this movie, you still have no idea what exactly happened on screen, and especially what the ending of this movie really means, don’t worry, because then and without further ado, we open the analysis and explanation of  I’m thinking of ending things .

What the heck is going on in “i’m thinking about ending things”?

Let’s not beat around the bush and get straight to the point. At the beginning of the film we see two segments, which apparently have nothing to do with each other:

  1. The story of “Lucy” (we’ll get back to that soon) and Jake. The couple is on their way to visit the big man’s parents.
  2. Scenes of a school janitor, which seem rather random.

The janitor scenes are real, Lucy and Jake’s story is primarily a hallucination of the school janitor.

Why would the janitor have such a hallucination?

A mix of two pretty serious factors, by the way:

  1. The janitor suffers from a condition called Lewy Body Dementia, a neurodegenerative disease that includes symptoms that we saw in the scenes where the old man appears: tremors, stiffness, slowness; and also the appearance of quite vivid hallucinations that include not only the sense of sight and hearing, but also of taste, touch and smell. In other words, someone with this condition can have a rich sensory experience, without distinguishing it from reality.
  2. The janitor was left in his truck, in the middle of a snowstorm, in freezing temperatures, and therefore is suffering from severe hypothermia. This type of hypothermia -which we could see because the old man took off his clothes- aggravated the preexisting mental condition, and caused the possible mental defenses to fall completely, causing the hallucination that we saw in the form of the story of Jake and Lucy.

And how do I know that the janitor suffered from Lewy Body Dementia?

Well, it is one of the details that you have to pay close attention to. When the hallucination begins to crumble (evidently the janitor is dying), Jake’s father appears elderly and informs Lucy that he cannot remember many things, and that she has to label the rooms and objects in his house, to remember them.

Lucy asks him if he suffers from Alzheimer’s, but the old man confirms that it is not about that, but about Lewy Body Dementia, evidently it is a reflection of the condition the janitor suffers from.

Who really is Lucy?

The key is in the conversation over dinner. Lucy tells Jake’s parents that they met on a trivia night, where Jake was playing games and somehow they started talking and then she gave him her phone number.

But, here comes the glitch in the Matrix, or well, a mistake in the hallucination. First of all we see that Lucy completely changes her mood when she tells the story. Then we see that the story changes, first she says that she started talking to Jake when she asked her for the name of her trivia team (Brezhnev’s eyebrows). Then she says that they had not spoken, but only exchanged glances, which causes commotion at the table.

This is obviously an invention of the Janitor’s mind. The Janitor surely saw a woman with Lucy’s face once one trivia night, but they never exchanged a word, and even her name is made up, that’s why we see the girl sometimes called Lucy, other times Louise, other times Louisa , and even Ames. Those are the names of some women whom the Janitor felt afection to, or even loved, but up to there.

Also consistently inconsistent is the fact that Lucy changes occupation almost every scene, being a physicist, a poet, a film critic, and even a waitress.

In conclusion: Lucy is the version of the ideal woman that the sick and dying mind of the Janitor created from all the women who were important in his life, and that works as the way to externalize his own misery.

So Jake is the Janitor?

Indeed Jake is the most faithful representation of the Janitor, when he was young. In one of the dialogues, Jake affirms that being young is the ideal version of each person, and that is why his mind decides to see himself that way, in his best years of youth. And we can say that the Janitor’s name is indeed Jake.

But all the characters in the hallucination correspond to a part of the experience, or of the Janitor’s personality.

Who really is the Janitor?

According to the pieces that we can rescue from both the hallucination and the real scenes of the Janitor, we can assume the following about Jake:

  1. He grew up on a farm, along with his parents, who must have provided him with some kind of comfort, but who were also quite weird and even violent.
  2. He was an only child, and over time he had to take care of his parents, as they aged, feeding them and watching them die.
  3. He never left his parents’ farm, where he lived until his death.
  4. He was quite literate, consuming books, and especially a lot of popular culture, cinema and theater, especially musicals.
  5. He also had to read a lot about other subjects, such as physics, and science in general.
  6. Being tied to his parents and to his farm, he was never able to develop strong enough emotional ties to be independent, and therefore did not have the motivation to grow professionally, despite being very intelligent.
  7. When he wanted to find someone to share his life with, his previous lifestyle, he simply made it impossible, until he ended up alone on his parents’ farm, with a job as a Janitor and with a serious mental illness.

What does the end of “i’m thinking of ending things” mean?

The end of the film, involves the conflict in Jake’s mind, between dying peacefully in a hallucination that gives him some peace (at least he is not alone, he is with Lucy), and his survival instinct that tells him he has to do something, and that he should not let himself die locked in his truck in the middle of the snow.

This conflict is observed in the dance scene, Jake is dancing with Lucy, enjoying his moment of happiness, but his survival instinct (the policeman) tries to force him to come out of the hallucination and fight. But in the end, Jake ends up accepting his death, thinks of the end as his only way out, and achieves it in one last act in which he receives all the applause he never received in life, for the achievements he never had.

What is the message of the movie?

Message? Well, rather, messages … the film refers to various written and audiovisual works that indicate Jake’s reflections, which incidentally invite us to reflect as spectators.

  1. Ralph Albert Blakelock’s paintings : in which the expression of trauma through painting is discussed. A very well posed metaphor, since the film itself is a deep and artistic expression of a monstrous trauma such as living a lifetime in complete solitude and without having achieved any of your dreams.
  2. A woman under the influence : Oscar-winning film directed by John Cassavetes and starring Gena Rowlands and Peter Falk. The film here implies the extent to which the labels and expectations of society towards its individuals generate in them the aforementioned traumas. In the film, a woman suffers the consequences of fitting in with the labels of being a good mother and a good wife. Labels can also be negative, and the worst part is that it is usually much easier to fit in a negative label than to try to reach a positive one.
  3. Ice by Anna Kavan: A novel in which after an apocalypse, which covers the earth in ice, a man tries to get the attention of a woman. This is a reference to the very build of Jake, a man nearing the end, and trying to achieve a little happiness with an invention of his own mind.
  4. Rotten Perfect Mouth by Eva HD: A book by a Canadian poet, in which she tells with an open heart, the emotional traumas she has been through.
  5. Something Supposedly Funny I’ll Never Do Again , by David Foster Wallace: Where he recounts the experiences on a pleasure cruise, and how the very structure of the cruise, where his needs are met at every level, drives him to despair. This work is in tune with the following book.
  6. Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord: It is a book that very openly analyzes how society was transformed by its representation in the mass media. Basically the author indicates that the media have created an artificial template for life that we, the new generations, try to emulate, considering the achievements on screens as the quintessence of our existence. Here, and in conjunction with the previous book, Jake, a fan of musicals and cinema, tries to reach the pinnacle of existence imparted by the mass media: a perfect girl who shares his same mental scheme, tastes and who also finds him physically desirable. Never able to come up with such a panacea, he goes into despair (like Wallace on the Cruise Ship) and ends up completely alone.
  7. Baby, It’s Cold Outside by Frank Loesser: It is a song originally intended to tell people that it was time to leave the bars, back in the 1940s (the movie perhaps incorrectly indicates that the song was written in 1936). It is a conversation between a girl and a boy, the boy wants to go with her, she claims that she has other things to do. Feminism has found the song an apology for rape, for including references to giving the girl alcohol to have sex with her. It’s an interesting inclusion because it implies that Jake has also faced the clash between her prevalent mindset in her youth (homosexuality is a disease, women should stay home), with the new awakening. And like, maybe, because of that, another layer of alignment was added against him. He is not only an old man,sick and without achievements, but on top of an old man who does not understand current times, and nobody is willing to guide him, either.

What can we learn from this movie?

We all have dreams and aspirations, but this movie forces us to wonder how proper and appropriate those dreams are. Some have dreams associated with the pattern imposed by society: marrying, having children, going into debt to have a house, a car, perhaps a farm, perhaps a business. Others have dreams associated with what the media impose: A hot body, being sexually active, finding someone who is a perfect fit for you, and living a romantic and intense love at the same time. There are also other templates, the good son who cares for his parents until they die, or that of conformism, out of fear or lack of motivation to go as far as possible.

The film invites us to reflect on what it is that will make us at the end of our days really happy with our decisions. It invites us to think that perhaps by thinking too much of others, we end up destroying ourselves. It invites us to double think on establishing life patterns as models to achieve, without really thinking about what makes us happy. It invites us to be careful with our decisions.

But even more importantly, it invites us that in the process of knowing ourselves, and seeking our happiness, we do not just dismiss others, simply because they are not precisely what we are looking for.

Questions? Annotations? More doubts? The comments section is open just below this post so feel free to use it. See you in the next installment of Ending Explained here at El Sabanero X.

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ending explained

The Hater ^ Ending Explained

Have you ever felt that in spite of all your efforts, sacrifices and good results, the rest of the world simply treats you as if you deserve nothing more than the leftovers from others? What would you be willing to do to finally be someone in that hermetic world in which social mobility is becoming harder and harder?

Polish director Jan Komasa uses these questions as the framework for his 2020 film, The Hater (Original title in Polish: Sala samobójców. Hejter ), a very interesting study of character that – in 136 minutes – reveals to us how social networks actually work starting from the positioning of brands, the so-called influencers, to politics.

Now, if after watching the movie you have been left with questions, doubts or concerns, do not worry, because right now and without further ado we will explain this movie in detail. Let’s start!

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ending explained

Underwater ^ Ending Explained

Following the monumental failure both with the critics, and at the box office with the new version of Charlie’s Angels, Kristen Stewart returns to the big screen with something quite divergent from her recent works: a thriller flick that mixes horror and science fiction. The name of the movie? Underwater.

Now, if in the deep of this mess that includes underwater platforms, madness attacks, and monsters, you have been left with some other doubts or question, do not worry, because now and without further ado, we begin with the Analysis and Explanation of … Underwater

1 | Where the hell are the characters of Underwater and why?

The plot of the film takes place at a deep underwater drilling station called Kepler Station, which belongs to an oil and gas corporation called Tian Industries. The goal of the station is quite simple – drilling the underwater bed until they can find oil and pump it to the surface.

The issue is that Kepler Station is at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, with 6 miles – 10 kilometers – of sea just above. If you think that is not quite much, I can tell you at that depth the pressure that is around 1000 atmospheres, enough to pulverize anyone who is directly exposed to it.

2 | What the hell are the creatures that attacked the Kepler Station?

Well, the point is that at that depth in the sea there is something known as thermal bubbles, a kind of completely isolated area, with its own ecosystem that can exist in gigantic caves in the seabed. In fact it is considered that some scientists theorize these bubbles could contain prehistoric species that have been preserved due to their isolation.

In the film it is presumed that the drilling activity of the station burst one of these bubbles, releasing the specimens isolated there, which apparently include 1) a gigantic alpha predator, 2) the predator’s “fleas” – the monsters looking like ghosts – and 3) some kind of creature with tentacles, which are apparently the food of the alpha predator.

Everything indicates that within the bubble the ecosystem worked like this: creatures with tentacles obtained energy from the heat they could found around, so it had claws. These creatures served as food for the alpha predator, who in turn maintained a symbiotic relationship with the ghostly monsters. And with symbiotic relationship I mean that, the fleas physiognomy seemed to be designed to suck whatever the body fluid of the alpha predator was, and likewise, the alpha predator seemed to have the ability to control them.

3 | What happened to Kepler station?

According to season data, the water temperature rose 10 degrees before it crushed. This undoubtedly confirms the theory of the thermal bubble. The drill broke one of these bubbles, and its hot water mixed with the water surrounding the station, raising the temperature. And well, it also released the monsters mentioned above.

One of them, the alpha predator, possibly seeking heat from the station’s core, possibly clung to it, generating massive structural damage. The point is that at that depth with that pressure, any structural damage becomes catastrophic, and that is why once the damage started, there was no way to reverse it.

4 | Who were the six survivors of the Kepler attack and what happened to them?

Norah Price (Kristen Stewart), mechanic specialist. In the end, presumably dead, by detonating the core of the Roebuck station, to destroy the alpha predator and its fleas.

Lucien (Vincent Cassel), the captain of the Kepler station. He dies sacrificing himself so that Norah could survive. Both were ascending at a frantic pace, which made their suits weaken, Lucien broke loose from Norah, and in the implosion generated when the water destroyed his suit, he saved her by sending her to the sea bottom, leveling her pressure.

Emily Haversham (Jessica Henwick), her work had to do with the orographic analysis of the seabed, survived in one of the capsules they found at Roebuck station.

Paul (TJ Smith), a subject with a very sharp humor. He dies when – in an underground tunnel – one of the creatures attacked him, breaking his suit, and literally sucked him out of it.

Liam Smith (John Gallagher Jr.), survived in the second capsule that left Roebuck Station, thanks to Norah’s sacrifice.

Rodrigo (Mamoudou Athie), dead, after going out into the 1000 atmosphere pressured water and having his helmet broken, which inevitably leads him to implode, leaving his shattered parts all over the place.

5 | What is the matter with Captain Lucien’s daughter?

It seems Lucien had informed the entire Kepler crew that he had a daughter, who should be Norah’s same age – Kristen Stewart is 29 years old – however when asked about her, he says she is 14. Then, in the Sheppard station – in which Lucien had spent a lot of time, doing explorations in the past – Norah realizes that Lucien’s daughter, died when she was 14, about 15 years ago. 

6 | What was Captain Lucien’s plan to escape alive?

The plan was to leave Kepler Station, the most modern station in charge of the perforation activity, and walk through a tunnel to Control Station (which is in fact, where they find Emily and Smith), and then advance to Midway station, to fill their oxygen tanks and finally to Roebuck station, where they could board the capsules that would take them to the surface.

Lucien discarded Sheppard station, claiming it was abandoned, when in fact, he was doing it so his crew would not realize several of his secrets.

7 | Why did Lucien not want the crew to arrive at Sheppard station?

Because at that station there was evidence that Lucien knew about the dangers of drilling the underwater bed at that point. In the information Norah found there, in addition to knowing the secret of his dead daughter, she discovered that in the exploratory stage there were indications of that – in addition to oil – in the area there could be those thermal bubbles isolated with exotic fauna in there. Very exotic

8 | Is Norah really dead? Why did she sacrifice himself?

Well, there is no indication that Norah is not dead, since she was not seen repairing the capsule, nor looking for an escape method. The point is that the alpha predator, which is apparently much smarter than it seems, realized that two capsules were escaping, and somehow ordered his fleas – the ghostly monsters – to attack them.

Realizing that the two capsules were going to be destroyed, Norah made the decision to end the alpha predator, its fleas and the other monsters, initiating a reaction in the core that would make it unstable, generating an explosion. Thus, she destroyed the monsters, and saved Smith and Emily.

9 | What does the end of Underwater mean?

At the end of the film, we can hear Norah’s monologue, one monologue that reflects the one, at the beginning of the movie in which she talks about the dangers of drilling the seabed to such depth, both for environmental and psychological aspects, in the end she concludes that her life is the price that she had to pay for being part of that venture, a kind of self-imposed punishment.

10 | Does Underwater have post-credit scenes?

It has no post-credit scenes, but some interesting cuts during the credits. In these clippings, which are segments of journalistic notes and documents, it is revealed that in fact Smith and Emily survived, but their testimonies were classified by Tian Industries, as well as all the recordings.

It was also revealed that the press suspects that something else actually happened at the Kepler station that Tian refuses to recognize, but they stick to the official version: there was an accident on account of the enormous pressure at the station, and there were only two survivors .

11 | What is the message of the movie?

Evidently ecological, it is a critique of the exploitation of hydrocarbons at any cost and the consequences that such activities could bring over. Likewise, although very briefly, the film tries to sell the idea that sacrifice and self-denial are not unconditional, but on the contrary, are born of the guilt or the need for redemption and rectification of some, as happened with Lucien, and then with Norah.

12 | Will there be a sequel to Underwater?

It depends on the box office. Underwater expects a return of 10 million dollars at the US box office on its premiere weekend and if it manages to raise at least 200 million dollars at the global box office, it is very certain that there will be a sequel. Much more if it exceeds that figure. We will keep you posted about this matter.

If the movie is good or bad, we will discuss that later, on the review of the film. Questions? Annotations? Doubts? Insults? The comments section is open just below this post. See you in another post of Ending Explained, here on El Sabanero X.


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ending explained Movie Explained

Tau (Netflix Original) ^ Ending Explained

Did you just watch Tau and turned off Netflix with a lot of questions about what Tau really was, What Alex’s secret project was really about, why he chose Julia or even what is the meaning of the final scene in the movie? Do not worry, my dear friends, we will answer all these questions and more, you just gotta keep reading. Welcome!

tau ending explained

1 ^ What is Tau?

As Alex explained around the second act of the movie, Tau is an Advanced Level Artificial Intelligence Console, which through a complex system of algorithms including decision-making based on probabilistic calculations, it is able to learn about its experiences.

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Análisis y Explicación Cine y Televisión

mother! 15 Unanswered Questions Explained

Let’s be honest. These days, most of the moviegoers buy the tickets expecting to see Vin Diesel flying through the air catching his amnesic ex-wife. And because of that kind of unrealistic expectations, a lot of people who went to see mother! end up very confused and frustrated, not getting the point of the whole story. And it is easy to understand why.

mother! is a very deep and emotional film with a premise that is definitely not so clear for the average viewer, specially if they see the movie just once. So, in order to find out what is exactly going on in this movie, it is necessary, not only reading between lines, but also paying extra attention to the keys given by Aronofsky and Jennifer Lawrence in several promotional interviews.

So if you left the movie theater with more questions than answers, this is the right post for you. Without further ado, let’s start with the Analysis and Explanation of mother!

mother ending explained

1 ^ Is there a post-credit scene in mother! ?

The end of mother! is so ambiguous and confusing, at least the first time you see it, that it is not even weird to find some people staying through the credits waiting for a final clarifying scene giving some light to the convoluted plot … but no. mother! has no post-credits scenes.

2 ^ Why the title of the movie “mother!” is written in lowercase?

This is perhaps the most important clue the director gives about what the fuck is actually going on in the movie. If you see all the credits at the end of the movie, absolutely every single word is in lowercase- the names of the actors, the director, the titles, the characters, including Jennifer Lawrence’s mother. The ONLY exception (not related to Paramore Song, thanks) to is the character of Javier Bardem, who is named as Him, starting in capital letters. Any idea about who is Him?